Forum Posts

Nice 2 Have
Aug 28, 2021
In Button Makers & Badges
Here are some tips for you to create cool-looking outfits with Nice2Have Button Maker Machine! 1) CAPS and BERETS: You can add your style by using pin buttons on your caps and berets 2) THE CLASSICS (T-SHIRT and JACKETS): It is not a secret formula to share, yet it is still cool to use it! 3) CANVAS TRAINER & ESPADRILLES: Ever thought of using it on canvas or espadrilles? You should! 4) BAGS: Again, a classic one, this never gets old.
Want to Learn How to Look Cool with Pin Buttons? content media
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Nice 2 Have
May 14, 2021
In Button Makers & Badges
So, you have purchased our Nice2Have Button Maker Machine and want to make new pin-back buttons, bottle openers, or fridge magnet buttons. You have your designs ready, and you are clear to go! Then it is time to show you how to use the Nice2Have Button Maker Machine. Just watch video instructions that take only a few minutes. Enjoy! Three Critical Things to Know Before Getting Started 1) Mylar (Plastic Film) Usage: As mylar is a very thin material, we recommend double-checking to be clear about using only one. Even if it seems like you have only one in your hand, sometimes you may realize that you use more than one! Please check it with your thumb by rotating it on the mylar surface while holding. Most of the time, you will see more than one mylar on your hand. So far, most of the unsuccessful button-making attempts have been related to this issue. We have added an important video to the bottom of the page to show you how mylar affects the machine mechanism and button-making process. 2) Not Pressing the Handle With Enough Force When Connecting The Front and The Back: Second most common failure reason is not pressing the handle with enough force when you are at the final step of button-making. Unlike the first step where you press the metal cover, picture, and mylar (image on the left, 2nd step on the operating manual), while you press the back of the button, you need to be sure that the molds are stuck each other and fully closed as shown on the image on the right. You can see how the distance between the handle and body differs between the two steps. 3) Putting The Wrong Face - The Back Side of The Pin: We see some of our customers placing the wrong face of the pin onto the machine, which causes an unsuccessful button-making attempt. We put the picture of the correct face below to show it clearly. VIDEO MANUAL: PIN-BACK BUTTON MAKING VIDEO MANUAL: BOTTLE OPENER & FRIDGE MAGNET BUTTON MAKING IMPORTANT INFORMATION BEFORE USING - MYLAR USAGE & TROUBLESHOOTING
Operating Manual Video of the Nice2Have Button Maker Machine (How to Make Pinback Buttons, Bottle Openers & Fridge Magnets) content media
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Nice 2 Have
May 13, 2021
In Button Makers & Badges
We all know that learning new stuff sometimes gets time and hard to do, especially when you have limited time. We all have the same problems! You bought our lovely Nice2Have Button Maker Machine 2.25-inch and didn't know how to create a button design. Unfortunately, you don't know how to use Photoshop, Photopea, or any other editing programs. Calm down then; this post is all for you! There is an excellent way to create wonderful button designs easily without knowing about photo editing programs or buttons. So here it is! Click the link below and enjoy the easiest and free way to design all types of buttons in few minutes. All you need to do is sign up for the system for free and enjoy the web-based program. You can then print it out and create your badges with our Nice2Have Button Maker Machines. We also added a video to show you how to use the program and our pre-designed button pins. Click the video below to watch it! Link to Nice2Have Ready-to-Use Button Designs: https://www.nice2have.me/forum/free-pin-button-designs Link to Button Guy Online Button Designer (Thanks to The Button Guy!): https://button-designer.com/online-button-maker/desktop/index.php Click here to buy Nice2Have Button Maker Machine Set from Amazon.
The Easiest Way You Can Design a Badge if You Don't Want to Learn Photo Editing Programs content media
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Nice 2 Have
May 12, 2021
In Button Makers & Badges
You can find a free editable template for 2.25-inch buttons in this post, which you can edit with standard editing programs like photoshop, etc. We strongly recommend Photopea (www.photopea.com), which is all enough to design buttons for the ones who don't have licensed programs. You can easily open AI, PSD, and other file types in the program. Before you go, please download the PSD files for a single template, which you can then use together with a page template to print out. Nice2Have Button template design 2.25 inch - single button Nice2Have Button template design 2.25 inch - page template You can also find a video for beginners showing how to use photopea simply to design a button to get the most of it from your Nice2Have button maker machine.
Free Editable 2.25 inch Template to Design Buttons for Your Button Maker Machine content media
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Nice 2 Have
May 12, 2021
In Button Makers & Badges
By reading this post, you will be able to make proper buttons and understand the basic tricks. You can download the content the link attached below: Don’t forget. Buttons are three-dimensional objects. Your image covers the face of the button, wrap around the sides, and gets tucked in behind the pinned back. Here is the simple information that you need to know while making a button with your Nice2Have Button Maker Machine. Hope it helps!
How to Properly Make 2.25 inch Button with Nice2Have Button Maker Machines content media
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Nice 2 Have
May 09, 2021
In Singing Bowls & Meditation
Although there might be several other reasons, there are four common reasons why your Tibetan Singing Bowl doesn't sing properly. We listed these four to make you sure that if there is a problem, or it is just about being a beginner about the Tibetan Singing Bowls:) 1) Cracked (hairline fracture): It is the most unlikely one, but it is possible! It happens if it is dropped very hard or hit very hard, potentially causing the Tibetan singing bowl to crack. You can go through the surface and have a close look at it. The hairline fracture is tiny, so it might be challenging to spot. If you want to be sure about it, just put the Tibetan singing bowl in the palm of your hand flat and give it a tap. If the resonance lasts more than two or three seconds, it is improbable to have a crack in it because it wouldn't continue to sound if it had a crack in it. 2) Wrong Sized Striker: If you are using a striker too large or too small, it going to be very difficult for the bowl to sing. As the striker creates the friction, it is essential to make the right amount of friction around the bowl to sing. 3) Holding the Bowl Incorrectly: One of the most common reasons, especially for beginners. When you are playing the bowl, you don't want to be putting your hands on the sides at all. You need to be only holding the base of it either with your fingertips or in the palm of your hand, keeping your palm nice and flat. If you try to play the bowl, it won't sing when you are holding the sides. But if you keep your plan nice and flat, you will see the difference. Sitting the bowl into a cushion is also one of the great ways to play it smoothly. (Still keep your palm flat if it is on your hand and don't touch the bowl with your fingertips) 4) Incorrect Technique: While you are playing with your singing bowl, it is essential to involve your whole arm, not just your wrists moving around—a lot of people are going wrong by just moving the wrist. When only using the wrists, the striker is on much more of an angle. We want the striker to be parallel with the side of the bowl while playing. Doing it with a whole arm while keeping the striker parallel with the bowl is crucially essential to play the Tibetan singing bowl. (Sometimes, it takes a little bit of practice.) Apart from these four, there is one more that can make a difference. People believe that you need to connect with the bowl energetically to sing with you. Whatever works for you, this is a common belief that having the energetic connection makes the difference!
Four Reasons Why Your Singing Bowl Doesn't Work content media
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Nice 2 Have
May 09, 2021
In Singing Bowls & Meditation
Sounds change emotions, heals people, increases focus. When the "right sounds surround you," you create harmony and gain control over your life. Think about your regular life. You suddenly start to feel better when you hear the tune that you like. It's an instinct that comes from inside and not a thought that you consider before. What if you use sounds more intentionally to change your state, thinking, and mood? What if you find a sound that makes you feel peaceful and better? Here is what Tibetan Singing Bowl does for you! The ages-old eastern tradition uses repetitive sounds that vibrate at a specific frequency to heal your mind, body, and soul. But how to find the right one? Plan how to use it: If you want to use the bowl for meditation or grounding, choose one with a sound that resonates with you. The larger the bowl, the deeper the sound it emits. Understand the quality: Please be sure that the poor quality bowls will distribute poor quality sounds. Sound will not be rich and resonant that lingers long after the bowl has been struck. If the bowl fails to hold its sound, it is not the right one. Metal bowls produce better sound quality in general. Old or New: It is all up to your choice. Older and antique bowls sound mellow, but you need to be sure whether they are genuinely antique. Real antiques should have a certificate that authorized institutions give. Of course, you should be ready to pay from a couple of hundred dollars to many thousands depending on the specifications of the bowl. Appearance: All the singing bowls are beautiful, especially the ones that are made in Nepal. Many of them are hammered by hand by Nepalese artisans. So, better focus on a look and sounds that resonate with you, and you'll be happy to use them. These bowls can have many different engravings, from chakras to various kinds of symbols. (We strongly suggest you have a look at our forum to understand the meanings of the most common engravings.) Where to buy: If you have a chance to visit the Nepal region, we strongly suggest you buy it from the well-known Nepalese artisans passionate about their work. But if you don't, buying online is the only other alternative. However, please be sure that the bowl is originally from Nepal. Purchasing it from a reputable seller that can give you strong guarantees would minimize the risk of disappointment.
How to Select the Right Singing Bowl? content media
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Nice 2 Have
May 09, 2021
In Singing Bowls & Meditation
Chakras are energy centers within the body. Seven main chakras are aligned along the spine, starting from the base of the spine and ascending to the crown of the head. Each is filled with a vital life force known as prana. As they spin and draw power from this life force, the chakras exert influence over different psychological, physical, emotional, and spiritual parts of the self. Crown Chakra – Sahasrara Top of the head Rules over wisdom, consciousness, and divine knowledge. Third Eye Chakra – Ajna Forehead Rules over intuition, imagination, memory, and psychic abilities. Throat Chakra – Vishuddha Center of the neck Rules over communication and expression. Heart Chakra – Anahata Center of the chest Rules over love, relationships, compassion, and acceptance. Solar Plexus Chakra – Manipura Stomach Rules over inner knowledge, power, discipline, and autonomy. Sacral Chakra – Svadhisthana Lower abdomen, sexual organs Rules over our procreation, sexuality, pleasure, and creativity. Root Chakra – Muladhara Base of the spine Rules over survival, security, and our most basic needs.
Chakras and Meanings content media
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Nice 2 Have
May 08, 2021
In Singing Bowls & Meditation
For thousands of years, humans have used symbols to communicate values, ideas, and profound concepts. Symbols require no words, yet they say so much. Symbols aren’t just powerful ways to communicate, they’re also extremely personal. You may find yourself drawn to a certain symbol because it speaks to something deep within you, something that defies an easy explanation. The right symbol can reinforce your beliefs, offer strength during difficult times, or remind you to seek calm and peace. On the pages to follow, we invite you to explore the significance and background behind various spiritual symbols. Here, you’ll find traditional Eastern icons as well as more universal symbols, such as the Tree of Life and the Cairn. Connect with the imagery that speaks to you, and let it guide you along your path. 8 Auspicious Symbols In Tibetan Buddhism, these symbols are said to be the luckiest and most sacred of all. Frequently seen in combination with one another, each represents a different component of Buddhist philosophy. The Parasol: Representing protection and shelter, the Parasol shows how Buddha’s teachings will shield us from the “heat” of forces like greed and lust. The Golden Fish: A symbol of joy and liberation, the Fish represent freedom from samsara, or the cycle of life, death, and rebirth. The Conch Shell: Used to call individuals to prayer, the Conch’s resounding trumpet represents the influence of dharma and its ability to awaken us from ignorance. The Lotus: A symbol of enlightenment, the Lotus mirrors human suffering. Growing through muck in order to blossom, the Lotus shows that we too may blossom through Buddha’s wisdom. The Urn: A symbol of abundance, the Urn is evocative of Buddha’s spiritual wealth, demonstrating that there is no end to his knowledge and wisdom. The Infinite Knot: With no beginning or end, the Infinite Knot reflects Buddha’s infinite compassion as well as the interconnectedness of all living things. The Banner: Also known as the Flag, the Banner represents victory over ignorance and the obstacles that block the path to enlightenment. The Wheel: The Wheel of Law, or Dharmachakra, is a summation of Buddha’s teachings. The eight spokes are Buddha’s Eightfold Path, while the inner hub is the discipline required to follow it. Bodhi Leaf - Emblem of Enlightenment As a young man seeking spiritual wisdom, Buddha resolved to meditate under a Bodhi tree and stay there as long as necessary. He would move only when he found the answers he sought. It was there, after 49 days of meditation, that he achieved enlightenment. Alluding to this powerful moment, the Bodhi tree and the Bodhi leaf are symbols of awakening and spiritual enlightenment. They also point to the importance of perseverance. In spirituality, and in life, it is rare for the answers to just come to us: it is only through humble dedication, and profound patience, that we arrive at a place of peace. Buddha - The Awakened One Teacher, philosopher, leader: Buddha was many things. But at his core, Buddha was a man who sought to understand suffering, and in the process, founded an entire spiritual movement. Born in 563 BCE in Nepal, Buddha was originally referred to as Siddhārtha and lived a rich, pleasant life as the prince of the Sakyas. After seeing suffering for the first time as a young man, he renounced his title and embraced asceticism. He eventually achieved enlightenment after meditating under a Bodhi tree. From there on, Buddha sought to teach others about the nature of suffering and the path to liberation. Characterized by unique features–long ears, spiraling curls–Buddha’s image and his story continue to inspire Buddhists and laymen alike. Cairn - Hope For The Journey Ahead Cairns are simple rock formations, used as landmarks to guide travelers along a path or to mark a sacred place. Cairns are some of the most universal manmade structures, and the practice of making cairns goes back thousands of years. From the Arctic territories of the Inuit to temples in Korea, cairns have been spotted all over the world. Cairns have evolved as symbols of friendship, safety, and direction. They offer guidance for those wandering life’s path. To stumble upon a cairn is to know that you aren’t alone, that someone has traversed the same terrain you now find yourself on. In this way, cairns remind us to never give up, that the journey is yours to make as long as you keep traveling. Coexist - Diversity is Beautiful Spotted on bumper stickers, t-shirts, and more, the beloved Coexist symbol resonates across all different beliefs and backgrounds. A combination of symbols from various spiritual traditions, it shows how we can live peacefully as one. Though our differences may seem vast, when we stand together, we are beautiful, united, and whole. There have been many variations of the Coexist symbol. However, the major icons used are fairly consistent. These include a star and crescent moon (for Islam), a peace sign, Om (Hinduism), the Star of David (Judaism), a silhouette of Buddha (Buddhism), the Yin Yang (Taoism), and a cross (Christianity). Dragon - Benevolent Beasts From St. George’s famous battle in the bible to the colorful creatures spotted in Chinese New Year parades, dragons appear all over the world and throughout history. While dragons are often depicted in the West as ferocious monsters, in the East they have different connotations. In Chinese folklore, dragons are auspicious creature symbolizing strength, life, and prosperity. Chinese, Japanese, and Korean legends associate them with water realms, where they serve as guardians of rivers, oceans, and rain. In Hinduism and Buddhism, mythical and semi-divine serpent beings known as Naga are occasionally portrayed as dragons. Dream Catcher - Sacred Hoop Dreamcatchers are Native American wood hoops crafted with a net in the center. They’re often embellished with objects like beads and feathers. Derived from the Ojibwe and Lakota tribes, dreamcatchers were originally used to protect children from bad dreams. Tribal elders fashioned them from willow and sinew and then hung them over a cradle or child’s bed. Like bugs in a spider’s web, the hoop’s net was said to trap nightmares and channel good dreams through the net’s hole. Today, dreamcatchers have been adopted by countless individuals as symbols of protection and good luck. Hanging dreamcatchers in the home, or even wearing dreamcatcher jewelry, is thought to trap negative vibes in order to keep the owner safe from harm. Chakras - Your Body’s Life Force Chakras are energy centers within the body. There are seven main chakras that are aligned along the spine, starting from the base of the spine and ascending to the crown of the head. Each is filled with a vital life force known as prana. As they spin and draw power from this life force, the chakras exert influence over different psychological, physical, emotional, and spiritual parts of the self. Crown Chakra – Sahasrara Top of the head Rules over wisdom, consciousness, and divine knowledge. Third Eye Chakra – Ajna Forehead Rules over intuition, imagination, memory, and psychic abilities. Throat Chakra – Vishuddha Center of the neck Rules over communication and expression. Heart Chakra – Anahata Center of the chest Rules over love, relationships, compassion, and acceptance. Solar Plexus Chakra – Manipura Stomach Rules over inner knowledge, power, discipline, and autonomy. Sacral Chakra – Svadhisthana Lower abdomen, sexual organs Rules over our procreation, sexuality, pleasure, and creativity. Root Chakra – Muladhara Base of the spine Rules over survival, security, and our most basic needs. Endless Knot Inextricable, Intertwined, Infinite The Infinite Knot, also known as the Endless Knot, is a line with no beginning or end that radiates both calm and movement. It represents the idea that everything in this world is interconnected. It is also symbolic of the Buddha’s infinite compassion. Dharma is continuous and inexorable, while time is but an illusion. The Knot of Infinity symbolizes that truth. The Knot also represents the idea that material life and religious thought are intertwined: the search for enlightenment does not mean giving up on worldly responsibilities. Eyes of Buddha Gaze of Wisdom Visitors to Buddhist stupas in Nepal cannot help but notice the huge pair of eyes painted around the main towers. These are the “Eyes of the Buddha” that stare out in all four directions, a dramatic symbol of the Buddha’s all knowing, all seeing gaze. Between the Wisdom Eyes, as they are also known, is a curving symbol that resembles a question mark. This is Nepali for the number 1. It symbolizes the oneness of the universe and denotes the one path towards enlightenment – this being the teachings of the Buddha. The mark is also the Buddha’s ‘third eye’, a symbol of his wisdom and infinite perception. Flower of Life Seeds of Connection The Flower of Life is made up of geometrically-spaced, overlapping circles. The center of each circle rests on the circumference of six surrounding circles. This interlocking pattern demonstrates the interconnectedness of all living things and the ways we are inextricably linked to one another. The Flower of Life’s circular patterns have appeared in the art of various cultures throughout history. An integral part of Sacred Geometry, the Flower of Life is said to mirror the patterns of cell division, and thus is seen as a model of creation itself. Ganesh The Remover of Obstacles A symbol of wisdom, Ganesh is one of the most revered Gods in Hinduism. Known for his kindness, he is recognized by his elephant head and rotund belly. With his ability to remove obstacles and ensure success, Ganesh is often called upon at the beginning of new ventures. Though Ganesh is a Hindu deity, he also appears in Buddhism and is the only Hindu God regarded as a Bodhisattva. He takes many different forms. Some Tibetan scriptures depict him as Vinayaka, a demon who must be propitiated in order to avoid destruction. Other times, he is Nrtta Ganapati, the dancing God and destroyer of obstacles who made his way into Tibet through Nepal. Hamsa Palm of Protection The hamsa symbol depicts an open right hand, symmetrically drawn, and often with an eye in the palm’s center. Seen throughout the Middle East and Northern Africa, it’s also known as the Hand of Fatima and the Hand of Miriam. The hamsa represents strength and power and is widely regarded as a token of protection. Worn as an amulet or hung in the home, the hamsa is said to ward off the Evil Eye, a malevolent stare which brings harm and misfortune. No one is entirely sure of the hamsa’s origins. Some date it back to the ancient Phoenicians, who used hands to represent the lunar goddess, Tanit. Today, it holds significance in multiple traditions. In Judaism, its five fingers represent the five books of the Torah. In Islam, they stand for the Five Pillars of Islam. The hamsa is also reminiscent of Buddhist and Hindu mudras, with the five fingers representing the five senses. Happy Buddha A Joy to Behold Full of exuberance, Happy Buddha is often mistaken for Siddhārtha Gautama, the founder of Buddhism. But the image of Happy Buddha is actually based on a wandering Chinese monk, Budai (Hotei, in Japanese), who lived centuries ago. Happy Buddha is believed to be Maitreya, or the Buddha to come. His plump figure and benign countenance suggest magnanimity and plenitude. Also called Laughing Buddha, his signature smile is symbolic of pure joy. Happy Buddha is considered a symbol of good luck, and it is thought that rubbing his big head or belly brings fortune and wealth. At the same time, his walking stick and satchel remind us to pay attention to the journey before us, not just the destination. Jizo Benevolent Protector Jizo is a Bodhisattva in Japanese Mahayana Buddhism, originally known in Sanskrit as Ksitigarbha. He is worshipped primarily in East Asia, where statues of his likeness can be spotted on roadsides. He is often depicted as a shaven-headed monk with child-like features and a large cloak. Revered for his self-sacrifice, Jizo is said to have delayed nirvana in order to help others. He is a guardian of travelers and firefighters. He keeps watch over the souls of children, especially those who pass away before their parents. Kuan Yin Compassion Personified Greatly revered across different Buddhist traditions, Kuan Yin is an example of the “sacred feminine”. Also known as Kwan Yin and Guan Yin, Kuan Yin first appeared in Chinese scriptures around 400 CE. She is believed to be the female manifestation of Avalokitesvara, the Bodhisattva of Compassion. Depicted as an ethereally lovely Goddess, Kuan Yin is a symbol of unconditional love, kindness, and mercy. She shields and cares for the sick, the unwanted, the unlucky, and the poor. As one who protects women and children, she is also linked to fertility. Followers turn to her in times of need, fear, or misfortune. With just a glance at her graceful countenance, you too may find her to be a source of calm and comfort. Lotus Flower Beautifully Triumphant One of the most poetic and inspiring flowers to behold, the lotus is noted for the wondrous way that it grows: before it can blossom in the sun, it must make its way through slimy pond muck. In time, the lotus rises above the water and emerges beautiful and whole. The lotus appears across many spiritual traditions and is widely regarded as a symbol of enlightenment. But the lotus also represents personal transformation. It offers hope that something beautiful can blossom out of suffering, that we too will eventually bloom. No matter where you are on your journey, let the lotus remind you to always trust in the unseen path that leads to the sun. Mudras - A Show of Hands Mudras are sacred hand gestures and expressions of inner wisdom. Each mudra represents a different action or form of energy. In meditation, mudras help maintain focus, allowing the meditator to channel a specific energy for their practice. Mudras are also a common feature of Eastern art, as various figures and deities are often shown gesturing with a specific mudra. In fact, mudras are some of the most distinguishing characteristics, helping the viewer better understand the meaning behind a specific statue or image. Vitarka Mudra Thumb and forefinger touch to create a circle A gesture of instruction, wisdom, and intellect, this mudra represents transmission of knowledge. The mudra’s circle also represents the perfection of dharma. Abhaya Mudra Right palm faces outward, fingers are straight A gesture of protection, reassurance, and comfort, this mudra means “no fear.” Bhumisparsha Mudra The fingers of the right hand touch the ground A gesture of determination and steadfastness, this mudra represents the strength necessary to overcome temptation. Mandala The Multilayered Universe A mandala is a square or circular chart with geometric designs. It symbolizes the cosmos and everything within. A mandala is constructed of concentric circles and squares that lead to a center. The eye is drawn to the center, making it a useful tool for meditation. Mandalas play an important role in Tibetan Buddhism, where they are used as a means of worship. Buddhist monks create intricate mandalas of colored sand, which are then destroyed upon completion. This act of annihilation signifies the transience of all life: nothing is permanent, no matter how drawn we are to its beauty or complexity. Namaste The Divine in Me Honors The Divine in You A traditional greeting, Namaste is a combination of two Sanskrit terms: namah (“I bow respectfully to you.”) and aste (“Let there be.”). Namaste is often spoken with a corresponding gesture. In this gesture, the head is slightly bowed and the palms are pressed together against the heart. For many, Namaste is deeply spiritual. It refers to the belief in a divine spark that exists in all living beings. In the West, Namaste is often heard at the end of a yoga session. It translates to “The divine in me honors the divine in you.” Namaste is more than a mere formality. It is a heartfelt expression of love and compassion. Saying Namaste with a sense of grace and humility gives birth to something beautiful: a moment in which one soul recognizes another. Om The Sound of Creation Om is regarded as the first sound that was emitted when all of the universe was created from nothing. A cosmic hum, it continues to resonate in all living beings to this very day. Thus, Om is both a primordial vibration and our connection to the divine. Om is used as a mantra within Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism. It bears striking aural similarities to the Amen used in Christianity, and the Amin used in Islam. Regardless of religious affiliation, many find its tone alluring, even hypnotic. It is no wonder that Om is used so often for meditation and personal ritual. It is simple to recite, yet profoundly powerful. And of course, it is beautiful to look at. Om Mani Padme Hum Sacred Syllables Om Mani Padme Hum is a mantra of benevolence and is often recited to inspire compassion. The syllable “Om” represents the body, spirit, and speech of Buddha; “Mani” is for the path of teaching; “Padme” for the wisdom of the path, and “Hum” indicates the union of wisdom and the path to it. Though commonly associated with Tibetan Buddhism, meditators across various practices find this mantra inspiring. Compassion, after all, isn’t exclusive to any one belief system. Pagoda Towers to the Sky Pagodas are tower-like structures often characterized by multiple eaves stacked on top of another. Seen throughout Asia, pagodas are adaptations of India’s Buddhist stupas, which were initially built to house the remains and relics of the Buddha. As Buddhism spread throughout Asia, stupas became a vital feature of Buddhist temples and their traditional dome shape slowly evolved into what we now know as a pagoda. Similar to stupas, pagodas were initially used to hold Buddhist relics, though many have since lost this function. The number of eaves on a pagoda sometimes has a symbolic meaning. In Japan, for example, it’s common to see pagodas built with five different tiers. These represent nature’s five elements: earth, fire, water, wind, and space. Shou A Life Well-Lived Shou is the Chinese character for “longevity” and can be spotted on jewelry, art, textiles, furniture, and architecture all throughout China. In Chinese tradition and folklore, longevity is considered one of the five blessings that form the foundation for a good life. The other blessings are health, wealth, virtue, and a peaceful death. In Chinese, the word for “blessings” sounds the same as the word for “bat”. For this reason, the five blessings are commonly depicted as bats, and the shou character is often accompanied by drawings of bats. Skulls Spotted in paintings and statues, skulls feature prominently in Eastern iconography. In both Buddhism and Hinduism wrathful deities are often depicted wearing necklaces of human skulls known as munda malas. In Tibetan Buddhism, certain tantric rituals require the use of vessels made from human skulls. These are known as Kapalas and were traditionally used to make offerings to the gods. In Tibetan Buddhism, skulls represent bliss, the limits of human knowledge, and the Buddhist concept of emptiness, or the idea that nothing has an inherent essence. Denoting death, skulls are also a reminder of impermanence and life’s malleable nature. Because nothing is fixed and all is fleeting, one sees a skull and is reminded to embrace empathy: live today, for tomorrow is not guaranteed. Sri Yantra A Map to Enlightenment The Sri Yantra is the most revered of all yantras, or mystical diagrams. It consists of nine interlocking triangles surrounded by two circles of lotus petals. In the middle is a dot, or bindu, which symbolizes the place from which all creation emerges. Its four upright triangles represent male energy, or Shiva, while the five downward facing triangles represent female energy, Shakti. Together, they represent all of the cosmos and the union of its forces. The Sri Yantra is said to contain the path to enlightenment. Its geometry is so profound, that meditating on its patterns is said to inspire divine wisdom and a sense of oneness. For this reason, the Sri Yantra is considered a powerful tool for spiritual growth. Stupa House of Holy Relics Stupas are religious monuments and the most iconic forms of Buddhist architecture. Inspired by India’s ancient burial mounds, the first Buddhist stupas were originally created to house Buddha’s remains. Today, they are used for worship and to commemorate different aspects of Buddha’s legacy. Some contain Buddha’s possessions or those of his disciples. Others mark a significant event in Buddha’s life. Some stupas represent his teachings while others are built as a form of devotion. Stupas are often dome-shaped and include several components of Buddhist philosophy as part of their design. Practitioners visit stupas for a variety of reasons. One may seek good blessings, make an offering, or pray for someone in need. When visiting a stupa, it is custom to walk around its base clockwise as a form of meditation. Tree of Life We Grow Stronger Together The concept of a sacred tree, also known as the Tree of Life, can be found in creation myths from all over the world. The Tree of Life has been spotted in art, architecture, and iconography from different cultures. The Tree of Life is a symbol of unity, representing the idea that all life on earth is connected: though we may branch out in various directions, each of us is part of something bigger. It honors the diversity of creation while celebrating our shared origins. It is no wonder the Tree of Life is regarded as a timeless, legendary icon. Umalome Life is a Winding Road The unalome symbol is a winding line which represents the path to spiritual enlightenment. There are many variations of the unalome, but the overall shape remains the same: it starts with a spiral on one end and then slowly unfurls into a series of twists and turns. Eventually, the line straightens. In some versions, the line is completed with a single dot. All these components symbolize the various stages we encounter on our spiritual journeys. The spiral represents our mind at its early stages, while the twists symbolize the various twists and turns we encounter as we seek to gain understanding. The symbol’s steadying line mirrors our own sense of internal balance: as we learn and grow, our paths become less meandering and more focused, until we eventually find enlightenment. This final stage is summarized with the unalome’s dot, which represents the moment we achieve awakening and are released from suffering. Vajra Tool of Compassion A ritual tool used for spiritual worship, the Vajra scepter is a combination of two powerful symbols: the diamond and the lightning bolt. The diamond, a substance which cuts but cannot be cut, represents resolute spirit. The lightning bolt, with its overwhelming force, represents great power. Together they represent compassion, the most powerful force of all and the ultimate path to enlightenment. The Vajra sometimes appears as a Double Vajra, also known as Visvavajra. Depicted as an X or shown in vertical form (like a plus sign), it represents the indestructible foundation of the universe. The Double Vajra also stands for protection, harmony, and all-knowingness. Weeping Buddha Image of Sorrow The figure of Weeping Buddha shows Buddha hunched over, covering his face with his hands. His image is based on the legend of a soldier who inadvertently vanquishes his only son in battle. Realizing what he had done, the soldier – who is none other than Weeping Buddha – began crying in shame. Weeping Buddha is said to be weeping for all the suffering in the world. It is also said that if we touch his back, he will take away our grief and troubles. In return, he bestows peace and provides the strength we need to live a good life. Yin Yang Balance is Beautiful A traditional Taoist symbol, the Yin Yang is shown as a circle with two halves, and each half contains a single element from its opposite. This configuration represents the concept of dualism, the notion that all forms of energy have an equally powerful opposing energy. Though opposite in nature, the Yin Yang’s components are complementary: neither is superior, and one cannot exist without the other. Everything in nature is based upon this dualistic principle. The key to existence, therefore, is balanced energy, with no single element dominating over the other. Thus, the Yin Yang is not only beautiful, but reminds us that the only true path to harmony is through balance. Zen Circle Elegant, Effortless Ensō Derived from Zen Buddhism, the Zen Circle is also known as Ensō, the Circle of Enlightenment, and the Infinity Circle. The Zen Circle is often drawn with a fluid elegance, inspiring a sense of peace and wholeness. Though circles are simple shapes, the Zen Circle conveys some of Zen Buddhism’s more evasive concepts: enlightenment, emptiness, and the beauty of imperfection. Part of the symbol’s appeal lies in its creation: the Zen Circle is executed in a single, effortless brushstroke, often in a moment when the mind is totally free from inhibition. In this way, it represents one of Zen’s most powerful lessons: don’t try so hard, just be. Original article was taken from https://blog.buddhagroove.com/meaningful-symbols-a-guide-to-sacred-imagery/
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May 08, 2021
In Singing Bowls & Meditation
In this guide, you’ll discover 9 mystical meditation symbols, including what they mean, why they’re inspiring and how to deepen your meditation practice with these spiritual symbols! Keep reading if you want to harness the power of these inspiring, empowering meditation symbols… What Are Meditation Symbols? In general, symbols are words, visual marks, or signs that hold a specific meaning or intent. Meditation symbols, as you might guess, are words, visual marks, or signs that hold a specific meaning or intent in the meditation practice. Such meditation symbols may be represented in a visual format, may be thought about, or might be chanted during meditation, for instance. Regardless of how a meditation symbol is represented or how it’s used, many find that they can be powerful if one allows them to be. While meditation symbols are optional to use, many find that they’re worth taking advantage of. Why Are Meditation Symbols So Important? Already, meditation alone involves becoming more aware. With the presence of meditation symbols, however, you can gain even greater and deeper awareness. That said, the use of meditation symbols alongside meditation can deliver an enhanced meditation practice. When fused together, meditation and symbolism can bring many powerful and beneficial changes to your life. As a result of the deeper meditation that meditation symbols might provide, they can completely transform you inside and out. For instance, you can benefit from improved sleep, greater focus, amplified cognition, and better memory. In other words, what you already gain from meditation can be achieved at a higher level with the addition of the use of meditation symbols. 9 Powerful Meditation Symbols And Their Meanings There are many different meditation symbols that exist. Each has their own different meaning or objective behind it. Some of these symbols are not just restricted for the use alongside meditation but are also present in different cultures and/or religions. Nine of the most common and most powerful meditation symbols at present include: 1. Buddha Eyes or Wisdom Eyes On just about every Buddhist shrine (stupa) in Nepal, the Buddha Eyes symbol is present on each of the four sides of the main tower.ö Buddha Eyes or Wisdom Eyes symbolizes the all-seeing (omniscience) Buddha. The small dot between the Buddha Eyes symbol represents the third eye, which in turn symbolizes spiritual awakening. Meanwhile, the curly figure (the nose of Buddha) of this symbol is a Sanskrit numeral (1) that signifies the unity of all things. This numeral also communicates that the only way we can obtain true awakening is through Buddha. In other words, if we want to know deeply and see clearly, the Buddha Eyes or Wisdom Eyes symbol guides us to follow Buddha’s word. More specifically, as a meditation symbol, Wisdom Eyes reminds us that spiritual awakening must be retrieved via the act of meditation. When we meditate, we get closer to achieving Buddha’s primary goal for us: enlightenment. Likewise, many see this symbol as a reminder that we must view the universe with compassion just as Buddha himself did. 2. Dharma Wheel Those who practice an Indian religion like Buddhism or Jainism may already know that Buddha’s teachings are referred to as Dharma. The Dharma Wheel symbol is an eight-spoked wheel that Buddha gave as an instruction to obtain enlightenment. According to Buddha, if we practice his teachings, all of our internal problems will dissolve, and we’ll be capable of achieving harmony. Apart from the instructions themselves, there’s plenty of symbolism behind the Dharma Wheel. The round shape of the Dharmachakra represents the flaw in the Dharma. Additionally, the rim of the wheel resembles the capability of concentrating and engaging in meditation. Lastly, the smaller wheel in the center of the Dharma Wheel represents discipline. Generally, this symbol represents all of Buddha’s teachings. This symbol acts as a reminder that through meditation, Buddha can help solve our problems and end our suffering as humans. All in all, the Dharma Wheel helps encourage our meditation as we lead to a path of enlightenment. 3. Sri Yantra The Sri Yantra or Sri Chakra is a diagram is used in the Shri Vidya school of Hindu tantra. This 12,000-year-old symbol is often referred to as the Mother of all Mantras. Featuring nine complexes, intertwining triangles, there’s quite some symbolism behind this visual. In the center of these intertwining triangles is a focal point, which alone represents the meeting place between the physical and spiritual world. As for the nine triangles, which form 47 smaller triangles, these resemble the entire universe. This powerful symbol is said to help clear all of your negative energy and lead you to higher consciousness. As you meditate on this symbol, you’ll find greater peace, harmony, and wholeness within yourself. Due to the complexity of this symbol, it’s best to have a physical photograph on hand during meditation. Simply focus on the center point or “Bindu” of this symbol. As you gaze deeply into the Sri Yantra, you can reap the power it has to offer. 4. Meditation on Symbolism of Venus If you know anything about Roman gods and goddesses, you might know that Venus is the goddess of love. It’s with love that we’re able to be our most genuine, authentic selves. To not love, however, is to be closed off from the universe and our true potential in life. And, without love, we attract negative energy. Venus is the perfect goddess to use alongside meditation. After all, love and meditation are strongly intertwined. They feed off one another. Using the vibrations of Venus as you meditate, you can rid yourself of the negative emotions hampering your ability to flourish as a person. After all, many people believe that love is the universal path to genuine peace and happiness. As you gain love and compassion for yourself, this can, in turn, allow you to feel love and compassion for the universe as a whole. In the end, meditating on a Venus the Roman goddess symbol can eventually lead you to a higher path of enlightenment. 5. Om/Aum Symbol According to Ananda, every major religion around the world recognizes the “om” or “aum” symbol, only that it’s referred to by different names. However, sticking with the Hindu “aum,” this vibration is considered the sound of the universe. We can break up this word or symbol into three different meanings: “A” represents the waking state. “U” symbolizes the dreaming state. “M” resembles the deep sleeping state. During meditation, “om” or “aum” is often chanted to help the meditator concentrate and remain relaxed through the process. Humming this vibration has the capability of helping meditators have an easier time opening their third eye. Those who are able to open their third eye benefit from powers like teleportation, materialization, and telepathy. Those engaging in meditation may also find that they have deeper meditation sessions and a greater connection with the universe. Even in written format, the “om” or “aum” symbol can help remind mediators to remain focused and calm while meditating. 6. The Lotus Flower A lotus flower symbol, while it might seem dainty and delicate, has a profound purpose in meditation for many. In general, the lotus flower symbolizes growth and enlightenment, which are two things we should be experiencing as we meditate. For meditators, they might be inspired by the growth cycle of the lotus flower from a small bud to a big, beautiful flower. Like a lotus flower, a meditator wants to eventually grow throughout the meditation practice and “bloom” into a greater version of themselves. That said, the symbol of the lotus can remind you who you can become as you slowly navigate the art of meditation. We all start somewhere after all. We’re never the best versions of ourselves right from the start. Neither are lotus flowers. By meditating with the lotus flower symbol, you’ll be inspired by the patience and progression of the flower and seek to be like it. Let the lotus flower encourage you to open your heart to the universe as it opens its petals to the world. 7. The Hamsa The Hamsa symbol, also sometimes called the evil eye symbol, is considered the Hand of God. This meditation symbol can be found in many different countries and is said to have universal representation in all cultures and religions. When facing upwards, the Hamsa symbol is used to ward off evil. When facing downwards, the symbol is believed to bring good luck. In terms of meditation, this symbol represents the unity of our chakras. Each finger on the Hamsa hand represents a different chakra. From thumb to pinky, the fingers represent the solar plexus chakra, heart chakra, throat chakra, root chakra, and sacral chakra. For meditators, the Hamsa symbol can act as a reminder of what one of the biggest goals during meditation is: to align the chakras. In fact, many find that the Hamsa symbol better helps them balance their chakras than meditation alone. Some may also admire than this symbol helps deliver happiness and melt away negativity that may otherwise hamper meditation. 8. The Mandala Many know that mandalas are beautiful, detailed patterns that feature a flower-like appearance. Like a snowflake, no two mandalas are exactly alike. However, what many aren’t aware of is what the meaning behind these patterns entails. In Sanskrit, “mandala” translates to “circle,” “circular,” or “round,” according to the Spoken Sanskrit‘s translations. While the translation may seem simple, a further translation would imply that a mandala is symbolic of the universe. Digging a little deeper, mandalas symbolize the integration of your mind, body, and soul as one harmonious unit. There are many different layers to the mandala symbol that make this representation clearer. The outer layers of a mandala are symbolic of the universe itself. Meanwhile, the smaller layers within the outer layers of a mandala represent the many realities on Earth. So, really, mandalas come to represent us on a spiritual level. While we may be complex and feature many layers just like a mandala, we’re beautiful, and we have a place in the universe. 9. Buddha One of the biggest religious and cultural symbols to ever exist is the symbol of Buddha. Siddhattha Gotama (563 to 493 BC) was the original Buddha. While the original Buddha is no longer alive, both the original Buddha as well as the broad idea of a Buddha are highly symbolic. For a Buddha to gain bodhi, the ultimate level of enlightenment, they often engage in the act of meditation. In turn, the symbolism of Buddha reminds us what our conclusive goal may be by engaging in meditation. Even for those who don’t wish to obtain bodhi can still find great meaning and purpose by meditating with the Buddha symbol. For many, Buddha represents patience, wakefulness, and conscientiousness. The latter characteristics of a Buddha remind us what we need to obtain to engage in the best mediation sessions possible. By essentially mimicking the characteristics of Buddha during meditation, we too can lead a more enlightened path. How To Use Meditation Symbols For Meditation? The best part about using meditation symbols is how many ways there exist to successfully incorporate them into your daily life. Some ways to use meditation symbols for meditation include the following: Place the meditation symbol you want to utilize during meditation in front of you. Focus on it as you meditate. If you prefer to meditate with your eyes closed, simply visualize a meditation symbol in your head. Imagine that you are the meditation symbol you’re meditating on. Chant the name of the meditation symbol of your choice out loud or in your head. Repeat a quote representing your chosen symbol out loud or in your head. During deep breathing meditation, paint, draw, or write a meditation symbol down on paper. The point is, there are many ways you can incorporate meditation symbols alongside your mediation practice. Even those who don’t regularly meditate can make use of these special symbols. For example, some people like to wear clothing, get a tattoo of, or hang a tapestry or artwork in their room featuring one of these symbols. Although it might seem cliche, meditation symbols are not just decorative visual representations but empowering emblems. Remember: it’s not about what ways you incorporate these symbols into your life, but rather, how they inspire you and important you make them. Source: The original article was taken from https://relaxlikeaboss.com/meditation-symbols/
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May 07, 2021
In Singing Bowls & Meditation
Symbols are a huge part of our lives whether we take notice of them or not, and in yoga they are very prevalent and hold a lot of meaning. Yoga symbols, like quotes, are an important part of human communication and are meant to convey a message, idea, concept, experience and/or spiritual belief in a visual form. Om Also spelt “Ohm” or “Aum” this symbol represents the sound of the universe and can energize your chakras. Om is also considered a mantra. This chant unifies all words and sounds in the human language. The sounds and vibrations created while chanting om can calm your mind and central nervous system and produce feelings of peace, tranquility and unity and will align your mind, body and soul. It can also reduce stress, improves concentration and can also support a healthy sleep cycle. Each part of the Om symbol has a very specific meaning. The dot located at the top represents the Absolute State or the 4th state of consciousness. This state of consciousness is where you connect with the divine and experience absolute serenity and tranquility. The 4th state is the ultimate goal of spiritual awakening. The crescent shape directly below the dot represents illusion. This part represents anything that gets in the way of you and the absolute state. To the left is the crescent are two curves. The bottom represents the waking state and the top represents the unconscious state. The waking state curve is the largest of the curves because it is the most recognized state of consciousness. This is where we experience things with in the realm of the 5 senses. Above the waking state is the unconscious state, also known as the deep sleep state. We only reach this state of sleep when everything subconsciously stops, even dreams. Between these two curves is one last curve that signifies the dream state. The dream state is exactly what it sounds like. It is what we experience before the deep sleep and represents our dreams. Lotus Flower The Lotus Flower, also known as a Water Lily, is an important symbol in many cultures. There is a running theme within the Hindu, Buddhist and Egyptian cultures pertaining to the Lotus. This special flower rises from dark, muddy waters and blossoms into a gorgeous and alluring flower. The really unique thing about this flower is the way it blossoms. The core of the flower and the pedals never touch the dirty water it grows in. As a symbol this represents the human journey of rising above any adverse or unfortunate circumstances and into a self aware and spiritually enlightened human being. Hindu Culture: Within the Hindu culture the Lotus specifically represents beauty – especially that of the female eyes, fertility, prosperity, spirituality and eternity. Certain gods like Laxmi – the god of prosperity and Brahma – the god of creation It is sometimes used as an offering to the Hindu gods as well as a part of Ayurveda medicine practices. Buddhist Culture: The Buddhist culture uses the Lotus to symbolize purity spiritual awakening faithfulness Buddhism really emphasizes purity due to the way the flower blossoms through the dark, dirty water unblemished. Buddhists put significance into the color of the flower, especially in paintings and other works of art. A blue lotus is typically representative of common sense and wisdom A white lotus is purity A purple lotus represents mysticism and the 8-fold path to Buddhism A pink lotus is the “true” lotus of Buddha A red lotus signifies the heart. Egyptian Culture: Egyptian culture places a lot of significance on life after death and the lotus is very indicative of this. Throughout Egyptian history the lotus represented rebirth and reincarnation. The Egyptians noticed how the flower disappears at night, only to reappear the next day – untarnished. They associated this with the rise and fall of the sun as well as life and death. It is said that the Egyptian Book of the Dead has spells and rituals that help transform you into a lotus after you die. It is also thought that the lotus connected and bonded northern and southern Egypt and represented unity between the two. The Lotus is important to many cultures and religions. It is a beautiful and perfect representation of our spiritual journey from darkness into the light. Hamsa The Hamsa is an important symbol in many cultures and has several interpretations. It can typically be found as a piece of jewelry or in paintings and other artwork.They all have similar meanings but vary slightly. In general, the Hamsa stands for protection against the evil eye and is meant to bring health, wealth and fertility. You will recognize the Hamsa as a hand with an eye in the center of the palm. It is always depicted as a hand with the 3 middle fingers extended. The way the thumb and pinky finger lay varies although, they will always be symmetrical and can have different meanings. Most cultures use the Hamsa to evoke the hand of god and help to avoid negative influences. These interpretations are pretty universal and also represents purity, spiritual awakening and faithfulness. In Jewish Culture: With in the Jewish culture, the Hamsa is heavily symbolic of the number 5. The 5 fingers represents the 5 books in the Torah and the five categories of sacrifices and offerings talked about in the Torah which comprise of burnt, sin, trespass, grain, and peace. There is also the five parts of the human soul: physical, emotional, intellectual, spiritual and God. Another correlation with the number 5 and God is that the 5th letter of the Hebrew alphabet is Het which is also one of God’s holy names. In Buddhist and Hindu Culture: In Buddhism and Hinduism, the five fingers are symbolic of the chakras and the 5 natural elements. The pinky finger represents the sacral chakra and the water element. The thumb represents the solar plexus and the fire element. The middle finger is a representation of the throat chakra and the celestial elements. The forefinger symbolizes the heart chakra with the air element. The ring finger is a symbol of the root chakra and the earth element. Mandala In Sanskrit, mandala means “circle” and is a direct note to the never ending circle of life and is meant to serve as a tool on your spiritual journey through this life. A mandala is typically used as a tool for meditation to help reveal someone’s path in life or to tell a story of where someone has already been. There are two main ways to use a mandala for meditation. As a piece of artwork or photo you can focus on a mandala and follow the designs, patterns and shapes. As you do this, your thoughts will calm down and allow you to understand the journey you have already been on or to show you guidance for a future journey. Creating your own mandala drawing or coloring in a blank image has been a super popular activity in recent years because of its calming and relaxing benefits. All mandalas are visually appealing and alluring. Colors used in mandalas also serve a purpose. Red = strength Pink = love, femininity Orange = creativity, transformation, self- awareness, intuition Yellow = learning, wisdom, laughter, happiness Green = physical healing, physical ability, love of nature Blue = emotional healing, inner peace, meditation Purple = anything spiritual Black = mystery, deep thinking, individuality Mandalas represent wholeness, unity and harmony. They should always be symmetrical with radial balance. They should also always be intriguing and draw a person into them, especially using numerous and vibrant colors. Buddha The image of Buddha is one of the most recognized symbols in the yoga world. The original Buddha was called Siddartha Gautama before his enlightenment meditation under the fig tree, which is still a sacred and protected site. Today, Buddha, or the image of Buddha, represents someone who has attained “Bodhi” and thus can be a spiritual guide for others. Bodhi is the ideal state of intellectual and ethical perfection. Buddha is also called the enlightened one who knows everything – past, present and future and has been awakened from ignorance to see things from an unbiased perception. Someone who can be called Buddha Has unbounded compassion Is completely impartial Non judgmental and does not discriminate Loves all living beings Has wisdom and power Is charitable Has high morals and self control Is honest and generous Is patient Is hard to anger and is non violent The Buddha is an important symbol for many people. It can remind you of the 3 tenants of Buddhism which are not to be ignorant, not to hate others and not to get angry. Buddha can also remind you to practice moderation. His last words to his followers were, “All component things in the world are changeable. They are not lasting. Work hard to gain your own salvation.” The Number 108 In most religions around the world, past and present, the number 108 holds some sort of sacred significance. The number represents wholeness, spiritual completeness and signifies the basis of all creation. The number 108 is also important in the yogic traditions and shows up in nature, science and ancient architecture. There are numerous examples of “108” popping up. The distance between the Earth and the Sun is 108 times the diameter of the Sun The distance between the Earth and Moon is 108 times the diameter of the Moon The diameter of the Sun is 108 times the diameter of the Earth There are 108 sacred sites in India There are 108 pressure points in the human body 108 energy lines that come together to form the heart chakra. We have 108 different types of feeling, 36 in the past, 36 in the present and 36 in the future. When making malas, garland or prayer beads, 108 is the number of beads used Stonehenge is 108 feet in diameter The High Temple of Lamanai, in Belize, is 108 feet tall The Tikal Temple in Guatemala is also 108 feet tall The Hindu religion has 108 different names for gods In Jainism there are 108 virtues. 108 is known as a Harshad Number which means it is divisible by the sum of its numbers 1+0+8=9 and 108 is divisible by 9 and in Sanskrit, “harshad” means joy In Sanskrit there are 54 letters and each letter has 2 forms – masculine and feminine and 54×2=108 There are 108 forms of meditation and 108 paths to God There are 108 Tibetan Holy Books Mala Beads Mala Beads are used during meditation, much like the rosary. In Sanskrit the word “mala” literally translates to meditation garland. Malas typically feature 108 beads and one Guru Bead. The Guru bead is always bigger than the rest and represents a spiritual guide. It is also used as a place maker for the beginning and end of your meditation. It can signify the relationship between a spiritual guide and their student. During meditation the rest of the beads help you keep track of how many times you say a prayer or mantra. Each time you repeat the mantra you move your hand to the next bead. Often times, malas also feature a tassel and it represents a connection between you and God, as well as you and others. Malas can be made out of numerous different materials and colors of beads and they each have different meanings. Red Jasper – Grounding, organization, creativity, empathy, rejuvenation, mental clarity and focus. Red Tiger Eye – Motivation, protection, perception, humbleness, confidence. I Garnet – Cleansing and energizing, self-confidence. Rose Quartz – Truth, harmony, unconditional love. Rhodonite – balancing and healing Unakite – Grounding and balancing. Carnelian – creativity, motivation, vitality, courage, Amber – Healing, cleansing, vitality, stress relief, emotional healing. Goldstone – Generates energy and protection. Citrine – energy and prosperity. Yellow Malay Jade – wisdom, moderation, and perspective. Honey Calcite – energy, vitality, confidence, strength, and persistence Green Aventurine – Compassion, empathy, perseverance, prosperity, decisiveness. Moss Agate – self-esteem, personal growth, inspiration, optimism Green Jade – calming and relaxing Malachite – Creativity, confidence, emotional balance. Blue Aventurine – communication and creativity Blue Tiger Eye – stress relief, motivation, protection, perception, humbleness and confidence. Indian Bloodstone – Healing, detoxifying, revitalizing. Lapis Lazuli – inner truth, self-awareness, and self-expression. Blue Sky Jasper – Protection Amethyst – Memory enhancer, motivator, tranquilizer. Protective. Balancing. Crazy Lace Agate – Calming, self-acceptance and self-confidence, concentration and focus. Sugilite – Protects and removes negative attachments. Smoky Quartz – Relieves stress while promoting serenity and strength Black Agarwood Eaglewood – Invigorates, purifies, calms. Obsidian – clarity, stabilizing, insightful, compassion, and strength. Black Onyx – Protection, strength, good fortune, vigor and health. White Howlite – memory, patience, calm, positive. Mother of Pearl – Healing, protecting, creative Clear Quartz – healing, cleansing Pearl – grace, purity, truth, happiness, compassion, and integrity. Bodhi Seed – Awakening. Spiritual promise, dedication, faith. Bayong Wood – stability, spiritually Tiger Eye – Protection and grounding, confidence, Brown Agate – inner stability, self-confidence, composure, and maturity, concentration, perception Tulsi – cleansing, provides protection. Rosewood – protection Ganesh Ganesh is a Hindu god who is always depicted with the head of and elephant and is associated with the first chakra. He is known as the Lord of Good Fortune and the Lord of Beginnings. He provides prosperity, fortune and success while removing both spiritual and material obstacles. The different parts of Ganesh also hold symbolic meaning. His big elephant head is a representation of knowledge and wisdom and reminds us to “think big” His small eyes remind us to focus and enjoy the small things in life. Ganesh’s small mouth reminds us to talk less and to embrace silence His big ears remind us to listen more The trunk is meant to symbolize versatility and adaptability Ganesh is usually depicted with only one tusk and this is to remind us to remember the good and forget the bad Ganesh can also grant wisdom and knowledge. Namaste Typically heard at the beginning and/or end of a yoga or meditation class, Namaste translates to “the light in me honors and acknowledges the light in you.” The word ‘light’ meaning soul or the divine. We say this to let each other know that we see them and share in their spiritual and/or yogic journey. When you are using the namaste greeting, bring your palms together at heart center and bow as you say “namaste”. It also represents gratitude, connection and respect towards each other. In Sanskrit, Namaste can be broken down into “nama” meaning bow, “as” meaning I and “te” meaning you and together means I bow to you. When saying Namaste, most people bring their palms together at heart center, representing the heart chakra or by bringing your your palms first to forehead center representing the third eye chakra. At the very least, namaste is an acknowledgment of being equals. However, to others it has a deeper, more spiritual level. Chakras Chakras are points along the spinal column, beginning at the base of the spine and ending at the crown of the skull, they are believed to be spots that energy flows through. The word chakra literally means “wheel or disk” and it describes the spinning energy life forces throughout various points in the body. A chakra can be deficient, excessive, or both. An excessive chakra needs to discharge energy and a deficient chakra needs to receive energy. Things like childhood trauma and abuse, cultural upbringing, restrictive and exhausting habits or beliefs, physical or emotional injuries and the loss of basic human rights can all effect and block chakras. When all the chakras are functioning correctly we feel balanced because chakras link our mind, body. The Root Chakra is located at the base of the spine near the tailbone area. Earth element and is associated with the color red. It represents our basic right as a human to be here on earth – it is our physical identity (self preservation) and our foundation. It is the chakra that helps us feel grounded. When this chakra is balanced you will be in good health and well grounded. You will feel safe and secure and be able to relax. You will be comfortable with your body with the ability to relax and prosper. If you are deficient in this chakra you may feel disconnected from your body, underweight, fearful and anxious, restless, unable to focus, disorganized and poor boundaries. The Sacral Chakra is located in the lower abdomen, below your belly button. It is the water element and associated with the color orange. It is our emotional and sexual identity (self-gratification) which represents our basic right to be able to feel – especially pleasure. It also allows you to connect to others and new experiences. When balanced you should experience graceful movements, emotional and spiritual intelligence, healthy boundaries and the ability to accept change. An excess of energy in the Sacral Chakra could look like sexual acting out or addiction, overly strong emotions and poor boundaries, over sensitive and emotionally dependent and manipulative in a sexual nature. If deficient you may have poor social skills and fear change. There could be a lack of desire, passion and/or excitement as well as a fear of sex or pleasure. The Solar Plexus Chakra is located in the upper abdomen. It is the fire element and shows up as the color yellow. The right to act is the basic human right associated with this chakra and coincides with the ego identity (self -definition) and transformation and the right to be an individual. When balanced you are reliable and responsible. You have appropriate self-esteem and confidence. You are spontaneous and playful with a good sense of humor. You have self-discipline and are able to meet and overcome challenges. When you are deficient in this chakra you may have low energy and low self-esteem which could create an addiction to stimulants. You could be cold emotionally and physically and be unreliable. You may be passive and play the victim role and blame others as well as be easily manipulated by others. The Heart Chakra is located in the center of the chest just above your heart. It correlates with the air element and the color green. It represents the basic right to love and be loved as well as your social identity (self- acceptance). When it is functioning properly you should feel compassionate, loving and empathetic. When the chakra is deficient you could be feeling antisocial, depressed, judgmental and lonely. You could be afraid of intimacy and relationships. The Throat Chakra is located in the throat. It is associated with the element of sound and the color blue. It represents the right to speak and hear the truth, this is also representative of your creative identity or self -expression. When your throat chakra is in balance you should show characteristics of a good listener and a good communicator. If you are lacking energy in this chakra you could have a fear of speaking or having difficulty expressing yourself verbally. The Third Eye Chakra is located between the eyes. It is represented by the element of light and the color indigo. It is associated with the archetypal identity and self- reflection. It represents the basic human right to see or to be seen. When is balanced you will be instinctive and perceptive as well as imaginative with a good memory. If you are deficient in this chakra you could have poor vision and memory, you could have a lack of imagination and difficulty visualizing things. The Crown Chakra is located at the very top of your head. It is connected to the element of thought and the color violet. It is associated with the right to know and the right to learn. When you are balanced in this chakra you have the ability to perceive and analyze situations and data. You are intelligent and wise as well as thoughtful and open minded. When you are lacking energy in this chakra you may have trouble learning and have a rigid belief system. These symbols are meaningful and important to yoga culture. They have been around for hundreds if not thousands of years connecting practitioners to spiritual enlightenment, guidance and meaning in this life. Symbols are something that carry meaning throughout many generations. Symbols can be personal and universal and mean different things to different people but they help us all understand things on a different level. They help us to share important meanings with each other. The original article was taken from https://yogarove.com/yoga-symbols/
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